Icewind Dale 2 is a multiplayer game developed by Black Isle Studios and published by Interplay Entertainment. Did he tell you any times about what he was looking for in his music, especially maybe in the late ’60s when he was…. They don’t have the ability to discard and add, and what they really do is reflect the scene and it’s a marvelous talent that they have, and I love to hear them play, but as real contributors and so forth they don’t add up that much. For people that are considered to be the most unstable, undisciplined members of society, the fact is that they bring to bear a kind of a discipline on their work that is practically unparalleled. But somebody might say, “Wow, I could be a stylist by just reaching out and being strange,” or reaching out and being different, or novel, and of course that’s a mistake. He may have heard it in the WKCR archives. Unfortunately, many of our best, yeah, performances are out there in the universe someplace, and you still as professionals have to go in at ten o’clock on Wednesday and make a record and hope that every few records you might catch a really good day. BILL EVANS INTERVIEW from August 1980 . Sometimes during a take, we wouldn’t even know that. To read our privacy and cookies policy, please click here. So, it was all just rumor. This thoughtful piece really pulls back the veil to look in almost as the sessions were happening. We were both living away from Phoenix for the first time as adults, and I took the train to NYC as much as I could to hear music. But that’s kind of a picture of the date, and it was all done in one afternoon as far as I can remember. So, I mean, how far can you go in that direction? - The Editorial Staff at JazzProfiles, "Anyone who has gone through Life and missed this music has missed out on one of the best things about LIVING. And Put Your Little Foot Right Out, which never got a lot of airplay, was on the Jazz Track album with Green Dolphin Street. Ashley Kahn told me the interviewer was Bill Goldberg and that he was an MD in the Boston area. [interjecting] Well, we all feel that way. (Lester Bowie’s was like a favorite comedy record — hilarious as well as insightful). You could get to a point where if you played any more notes it would be funny. Thanks, Rob Stokes Now, whether or not it will happen, I don’t know. And the rest of it is being professional and, certainly as professionals, you do reach a high degree of performance in the area that you’re trying to work, but those special times, you don’t know when they’re gonna happen, and, unfortunately, we don’t get too many of them on record. I was living in Philadelphia, starting a PhD program at Penn in music history and theory that I soon decided was not for me. After a few plays it became increasingly difficult to hear harmonies played with less density and tension. And so even though All Blues is a blues, it’s a particular kind of blues, it has a particular kind of structure, and it’s all contained in the chart, really. Yeah, that may have had something to do with it: just the fact that there were new kinds of challenges to play off, and there was a simplicity about the charts that was remarkable, too. But Miles is truly a stylist, but that’s mainly because he’s a strong, independent personality, and does things his own way, and always has, and just what we were talking about. I have listened to Miles for 40 years and appreciated Bill for the last 10. In a review of his book, I wondered whether Dyer would have been similarly drawn to musicians such as Henry “Red” Allen, Dizzy Gillespie, and Red Norvo, no less brilliant, who seem to have led balanced, eminently non-neurotic lives.”, Hi Steven, You don't know me - and I don't really know you, but I’ve been enjoying your Jazz Profiles blogspot for some time now. “One of the musical tracks I often use in lectures is the 1956 recordin... © -Steven Cerra, copyright protected; all rights reserved. A Bill Evans Primer. Since 1996, while continuing to teach and play, Chase has also been NEC’s chair of jazz studies and improvisation (1996 to 2001); dean of faculty, supervising classroom curriculum including jazz and contemporary improvisation (2000 to 2006); co-chair and then chair of contemporary improvisation (2005 to 2008); acting chair of liberal arts (2007 to 2008); and Berklee’s chair of ear training (2008 to present). Well, we know you’re in a hurry, and we’ve been here, and it’s been a really fascinating, great conversation. He’s not just a stylist or a great jazz player, he’s a great leader, and he’s served a marvelous capacity to bring many outstanding talents out and gave them the confidence and brought them out, and they probably didn’t even know that Miles was doing it. And I don’t know who all he listened to, but that’s the way he would sort of pick up things, and I don’t think; I think he certainly did listen. I think Miles’s blues solo on that track is one of my favorite solos of his. It’s really a professional, laborious process of bringing yourself back up, and you can often get to a superior take that way, but it becomes a lot of work, but if you can get that first fresh take and it’s good enough, generally that’s a real good one. But of course, the people involved were pretty gigantic when you stop and think of it. (Lester Bowie’s was like a favorite comedy record — hilarious as well as insightful). There’s a certain kind of people that are more or less late arrivers, you can – even though he was certainly on the scene and known and respected – you can hear him building his abilities from the beginning very consciously and very aware of every note he played, theoretically and motivically and everything. Amazing and insightful. Now there are always a lot of early arrivers that have great facility. I think it’s all in the music anyhow. Of two albums Bill Evans have recorded for Columbia Records in the early-1970’s, this extravagant award-winning masterpiece from 1971 captures him at a high point in his music career. Our site uses cookies to tailor your experience, measure site performance and present relevant donation incentives and advertisements. And he would lay out a thing like on All Blues, say like “Play the chart and then before each soloist, the figure will serve as the little vamp, to enter into the next soloist.” And that’s all, everybody hears and absorbs it, and once we had the chart straight, the rest was up for grabs, and then we would play it and the first time we’d played each thing through, that was the take that’s on the record, so there are no complete outtakes. Breakfast with Bill Evans. The broadcast was from an audio cassette taped off the air live by Lewis Nash, listening in Bronxville, N.Y, then digitized from a copy of the recording in the late ’90s and transcribed by Chase between March 24 and May 8 of 2019. Style’s the hardest thing to get, and it’s not something you really strive for. Bill Evans is part of the design team that produced Icewind Dale 2. :Yeah, that’s a tremendous maturity, and yeah, it is, it certainly is. I think you just have to perceive it from what he’s playing and what he’s feeling and sense and know kind of where it’s at somehow. And you can’t, like if you compose, you could sit down, if you don’t feel like it today, come back tomorrow, and after six months you might have ten minutes of music. He’s a guy that will turn his mind toward certain areas of music or certain people and decide that there’s somebody or something or an area of music that he can learn from, and then he will. Nel suo saggio incluso nel cofanetto, il giornalista, autore e storico di jazz Marc Myers descrive la carriera di Evans come composta da quattro distinti periodi o fasi stilistiche. I think there was a point, in my own opinion, where he made a turn, reaching for a large audience, I don’t know, or what, with the bands, and I have often wanted to speak to Miles about that period and find out how he felt about it, what he thought he possibly had developed or learned or whether that was a direction he’d like to go farther in or what. And the other thing was that the first complete performance of each thing is what you’re hearing, like the, Miles ran over the charts maybe a couple times, say “do this, do that,” and then he laid out a structure, like you solo first or whatever. Lewis was excited about hearing as much as possible of the 126-hour Miles Davis Festival on WKCR and recorded three interviews on his portable cassette recorder placed near a clock radio in the bedroom where he was staying, if I recall correctly. Sometimes during a take, we wouldn’t even know that. The way he approached it, the sound he got was like crystal notes or sparkling water cascading down from some clear waterfall. But it turns out to be a very key thing, something that changes the character of the whole thing. Paul Motian: The 'Fresh Air' Interview Drummer Paul Motian has spent more than 50 years in music, working with jazz luminaries like Bill Evans and … I had to change the way the band sounded again for Bill’s style by playing different tunes, softer ones at first,” Davis had said. And that may account for some of the success of this album, that all of those takes are the first takes. You understand what I’m talking about. and it’s almost as intense as seeing a live concert, just watching him, he’s so, he’s thinking so hard about the solo, just watching him with the other members of the group solo. A fantastic read, very enjoyable. I think it locks into a kind of a creative mental process that has implications far beyond the people that even are doing it are aware, because the longer you do it, and the more you develop that art, the more you’re locking into an almost subconscious process. I think there was a point, in my own opinion, where he made a turn, reaching for a large audience, I don’t know, or what, with the bands, and I have often wanted to speak to Miles about that period and find out how he felt about it, what he thought he possibly had developed or learned or whether that was a direction he’d like to go farther in or what. Your contribution helps keep jazz strong on air and in the community. I think one thing that, in listening to the music of Miles through the years, that comes through, is that like technically or just as a trumpeter he does so much, it’s not; I mean like some people relate primarily to his muted style, and certain things that he was doing then. I knew a lot of people with those kinds of facilities, and they don’t know what to do with it often. I came across a blog curated by music college administrator and blogger Allan Chase with a detailed interview with pianist Bill Evans. This piece was originally published by FYIMusicNews. where just one note contains so much meaning that you just can hardly believe it. Reception. I could hear it in Marvin Gaye’s music years down the road; Little Anthony and the Imperials, jazz, soul, pop, they all owed Evans a firm handshake. I'm Sam Bush's Road Manager and I was the FOH mixer and recorded and mixed Bill Evans' show at Rhythm & Brews in Chatanooga on 11/12/08. He showed me one change on that which gave that whole structure a different thing. And I don’t think we would have had Coltrane or known Coltrane’s potential or the great contributions that he’s made, except for Miles and Miles’s belief in his potential. And at the end of it, it had an identity and that’s why he’s a stylist. Who knows? :Art Blakey said a few months ago that Miles was a stylist. He was more or less withdrawn, plus sort of off to the side of the bandstand, sort of half, not fumbling exactly, but just sort of searching. It was done by Bob Kenselaar over breakfast (Bill made omelettes) at his Fort Lee, NJ apartment in 1979. With that issue came a subscription offer that included a copy of the Bill Evans Trio’s. A few weeks ago I received an email from two ardent Bill Evans fans. I thought, if you shared my enthusiasm, they perhaps could be linked somehow to your blogspot.. It’s true, he has a charisma. That “stylist” almost seems to have a rather limiting kind of quality to it. And my first reaction was that this music could not be captured on record. Short interview with Miles Davis about Kind of Blue and the contribution of Bill Evans. Interview date: 1st January 1965 Interview source: Jazz Professional Image source credit: Image source URL: Reference number: Interview Transcription. After catching a recent screening of the Miles Davis documentary. I was still listening, though by now I had it memorized.’ His fascination with the recording led to his decision to put Evans on the cover of Downbeat’s December 1960 edition.”. You had spoken in your liner notes about comparing those sessions to Japanese paintings in which you have to draw lightly or else it breaks through the parchment. [Bill Evans talking about Miles Davis's change of style to jazz fusion] I would like to hear more of the consummate melodic master, but I feel that big business and his record company have had a corrupting influence on his material. The way he approached it, the sound he got was like crystal notes or sparkling water cascading down from some clear waterfall. Bill Evans: Interview 1; Back to Interviews Next . He would get things from people like that he could throw into his own work, and you would hardly know where it was coming from. “We know that the creative daring of Kenny Clarke originated an evoluti... © -Steven Cerra, copyright protected; all rights reserved. : Yeah, Kind of Blue is it, that’s what I understand, yeah. (1964) Trio 64 (1964) Nirvana (1964) Trio 64 is an album by American jazz musician Bill Evans, released in 1964. You know, Billie’s Bounce and those things. it seems like there’s certain simple ideas that Miles uses, particularly in his chorus at the end of the piece [unintelligible?] Important, I mean. Did Miles listen to much other jazz or some of the different styles in the late fifties? So, in some ways he’s gotten a bad rap many times. As Kirk Silsbee alludes in the excerpts from the sleeve notes to th... © -Steven Cerra, copyright protected; all rights reserved. Yeah, he was describing him as that, rather than a technician. Some people try to be a stylist by being eccentric, and that’s not really being a stylist. I always like people who have developed long and hard, especially through introspection and a lot of dedication. In that sense, Miles is one of the all-time master technicians, in that he could play something which is an entirely original conception over something that’s very ordinary. Well, I often have said this, but I’ll say it again, that the most beneficial thing that happened to me in that association was that it confirmed my own identity to myself at a time when it would have been easy for me to go in certain directions that attracted a lot of critical and public attention, like sort of avant-garde, and I was, at that time, more or less, in the avant-garde, and could function in Third Stream and avant-garde, and the kind of attention you got sometimes could almost turn your head and you start perhaps thinking, well, maybe this is the direction, but being with the band and the real honest personalities involved really helped confirm my own identity, and made me realize that being myself was the only place to be. Interview Three: The Bill Evans Trio Pt. : Yeah. The following interview is one that Bill Evans gave to Jean-Louis Ginibre in 1965. Absent that, they're just people making a living, eating meals, paying bills — no different from cops or politicos. She mentioned that you had just spoken to Miles. Evans tucked himself away in the corner of the brain in such a way that it was as if life was one eternal cycle of springtime — renewal and rebirth. Thanks for taking the time and let me know what you think.. Kind regards, Geugie Hoogeveen the Netherlands, STAN GETZ / KENNY BARRON "PEOPLE TIME: THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS" By Gary Giddins, Zoot Sims at Ronnie Scott's - by Simon Spillett, The Complete Ray Draper Quintet Sessions 1957-58 feat. But I think one thing we do know is it’s a good thing because we intuitively committed to ourselves to it for that reason. , which never got a lot of airplay, was on the Jazz Track album with. Here is the interview with Bill Evans, originally transcribed and published online by Allan Chase. I had to change the way the band sounded again for Bill’s style by playing different tunes, softer ones at first,” Davis said. It was taped by Bill Goldberg at Bill Evans’s Fort Lee, N.J., apartment — not at a radio studio — with interviewer Goldberg, and is shared with his written permission. Important, I mean. Bill Evans told me that it's ok for this recording to be "spread around." Initially this was a project intended for Izaak, my son, who’s only two years old right now, but I think they’d be quite interesting for any true classic bop and hard bop jazz lovers. I went by his apartment and he had liked. I think Miles’s blues solo on that track is one of my favorite solos of his. ... Interview with Chris Albertson, The Jazz Set, 1971. Bill King is a jazz columnist and co-host of Soul Nation on JAZZ.FM91. Problem is; nobody's listening to them.. (Specifically the recent Roy DuNann piece..) So first of all: thanks for that! I came across a blog curated by music college administrator and blogger Allan Chase with a detailed interview with pianist Bill Evans. Bill Evans: Yeah, Kind of Blue is it, that’s what I understand, yeah. I was still listening, though by now I had it memorized.’ His fascination with the recording led to his decision to put Evans on the cover of the, Evans would join Miles Davis’s band in April, 1958, replacing pianist Red Garland. : Yeah, well, I had been talking to Philly Joe and the rumors go around. I could hear it in Marvin Gaye’s music years down the road; Little Anthony and the Imperials, jazz, soul, pop, they all owed Evans a firm handshake. : Oh, I first heard Miles on the very first records he made. Pianist Bill Evans was a giant of jazz piano and one of Marian McPartland's first guests on Piano Jazz in 1979. . He’s not just a stylist or a great jazz player, he’s a great leader, and he’s served a marvelous capacity to bring many outstanding talents out and gave them the confidence and brought them out, and they probably didn’t even know that Miles was doing it. As far as I know, this interview has been rarely heard since it was broadcast on WKCR on July 4, 1979, and it seems not to be available online until now. And he might talk to me about that kind of thing, but I’ve been curious about it because I didn’t completely sympathize with some of the music he got into. We don’t have any idea what we’re even saying. He was more or less withdrawn, plus sort of off to the side of the bandstand, sort of half, not fumbling exactly, but just sort of searching. And, there was a good feeling on the date, but I really had no idea, and I don’t think anybody did, that it would have the influence or the duration that it did, because you just go and you do, you know, you do your thing. Miles is the kind of person that if you have a conversation with him, you tend to remember every word that’s been said. , say like “Play the chart and then before each soloist, the figure will serve as the little vamp, to enter into the next soloist.” And that’s all, everybody hears and absorbs it, and once we had the chart straight, the rest was up for grabs, and then we would play it and the first time we’d played each thing through, that was the take that’s on the record, so there are no complete outtakes. It was taped by Bill Goldberg at Bill Evans’s Fort Lee, N.J., apartment — not at a radio studio — with interviewer Goldberg, and is shared with his written permission. You understand what I’m talking about. traditional chord changes…, Yeah, mm-hmm. In the summer of 1979, my good friend from Phoenix, the great drummer Lewis Nash (then 20 years old) was staying with the family of a friend of his in Bronxville, N.Y., and studying with Freddie Waits, Billy Hart, and Andrew Cyrille, and hearing as much music as possible.
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